Violet Photography & Design | Altoona, WI Lifestyle Photographer » Life. Captured.

Aspect Ratio Elaboration | Altoona, WI Photographer

While I know we covered aspect ratio the other day, I thought “Why not cover it using my photos?” Nearly every single one of my photos will be affected by aspect ratio, and that fact remains true for every single photographer out there. While we all edit our photos with a certain composition in mind, nearly every situation will require us to re-consider that composition when adjusting the photo for print for a client. I share my images on my website & Facebook with a certain feeling in mind, and that feeling cannot always follow through in a finished print. However, in nearly every photo I edit, I always try to keep enough room around my subject so I can accommodate nearly every print size. Sometimes that is not possible, and I am left trying to make the best out of the photos in-camera composition. Below, you’re going to find 3 different examples of photos of mine from my latest In-Home newborn portrait session. I will provide you with my Blog/Facebook composition and then a possible 8×10 crop. While I did not provide other sizing options, please be aware that each sizing option will potentially change the composition of the image.

In the majority of circumstances, my clients allow me to use my professional experience and judgement to make the best decision for their chosen print. However, in some circumstances the client may have a picture in their head of what they want the photograph to look like. If you do enjoy your photo as composed, you can always choose to print this way but there will be white “bars” on either side of your image to make that image the actual size you’re requesting. There is nothing wrong with this, in fact a lot of photographers will print their images this way especially in the case of professional model portfolios. However, in this event the client must make arrangements to accommodate that photo, whether it be by matting and framing the image, or ¬†choosing a less conventional frame size. Personally, I recommend that all clients choose to mat and frame their images. You would be very surprised to see the difference between a matted & framed image and one without a mat. This is another blog post though, so stay tuned for a comparison blog so you can see for yourself.

 

BEFORE 8X10 CROPPING

AFTER 8X10 CROPPING

BEFORE 8X10 CROPPINGAFTER 8X10 CROPPING

BEFORE 8X10 CROPPING

AFTER 8X10 CROPPING

So, as you can see there is not all that much difference between each photo, there IS a difference. Additionally, if there hadn’t been a lot of free space left around the subject, this could cause the photo to look a lot different. As a photographer, this is something you cannot always control, but is something you should work hard to control. Around important areas like hands, head, feet, leave enough room that a crop will not take something important off. I love tight crops, I like to get in close to the subject. Sometimes, however, that isn’t always possible and every photographer should shoot for their prints. If you have any questions, please post them below. I will be glad to help! As always, also remember that I do offer one on one training sessions tailored to your specific needs for $100 per hour. I also include a detailed study packet of all the information we cover in your session, so feel free to contact me to book your own one-on-one, today! Thanks for tuning in!